1. image: Download

    dustjacketattic:

flourless chocolate espresso cake

    dustjacketattic:

    flourless chocolate espresso cake

    (Source: grayskymorning)

     
  2. tubooks:

    If an author is in a position of power and influence do they have an obligation to do or say something about diversity in the industry? What do you think?

     
  3. retrogradeworks:

    elizabethplaid:

    incognitomoustache:

    saintbucky:

    Anthony Mackie being the first black superhero (and making Bill O’Reilly uncomfortable) on Jimmy Fallon (x)

    I am so happy that Anthony Mackie is a person that exists.

    For anyone who’s going: “But what about Storm/Hancock/Frozone/War Machine etc etc?”: they’re referring to the fact that the character Falcon was the first African-American superhero* created (debuted in Captain America #177 in 1969). If you’ve watched the clip, you’ll notice that Mackie corrects Jimmy Fallon when he says first black superhero. This is because the first black superhero was Black Panther - debuted in Fantastic Four #52 in 1966 - whom lives in the fictive African country Wakanda, and is thus not a citizen of the USA.

    (* = the word “superhero” is usually not used for hero characters that pre-date Superman, nor actually very often used outside the mainstream comic book companies aka DC Comics and Marvel Comics. This is why such characters as The Phantom, created in 1936 aka 2 years before Superman, and whom wears spandex and a mask and punches evil guys in the face, is not generally dubbed a super hero. Anyway, the point of this asterisk is that I have no idea how many fictional, non-“super” hero characters there were of African decent before 1966)

    Reblogging for uncomfortable O’Reilly and awesome comic book information.

    This is absolutely magical.

     
  4. 21:32

    Notes: 1040

    Reblogged from tubooks

    Tags: belleperiod dramasfilmdido elizabeth belle

    tubooks:

    anneboleyns:

    My greatest misfortune would be to marry into a family who would carry me as their shame.”

    Looking forward to watching Belle in May!

     
  5. blogsfeme:

    composed-of-wires:

    havendancehero:

    bigbardafree:

    this video is entitled “tumblr feminists” and i prepared myself to get angry before watching it but damn if it isn’t spot on

    "What they are really saying is that they hate women. They hate women with opinions who are honest and angry."

    I thought this was gonna be cissexist and then it wasnt

    required watching

    This is spot on and utterly superb.

     
  6. 20:56

    Notes: 128278

    Reblogged from gallopfrey

    Tags: busterarthurinternet

    (Source: solitaryparade)

     
  7. 20:55

    Notes: 325

    Reblogged from publishersweekly

    Tags: googlecharlotte bronte

    vintageanchorbooks:

Charlotte Brontë celebrated with a birthday Google Doodle. Brontë was born on 21 April 1816 in Thornton, Yorkshire, the third of six children.

    vintageanchorbooks:

    Charlotte Brontë celebrated with a birthday Google Doodle. Brontë was born on 21 April 1816 in Thornton, Yorkshire, the third of six children.

     
  8. theparisreview:

On that ever-mysterious rubric, “literary fiction”: “It was clever marketing by publishers to set certain contemporary fiction apart and declare it Literature—and therefore Important, Art, and somehow better than other writing … Jane Austen’s works are described as literary fiction. This is nonsense … Austen never for a moment imagined she was writing Literature. Posterity decided that—not her, not John Murray, not even her contemporary readership. She wrote fiction, to entertain and to make money.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

    theparisreview:

    On that ever-mysterious rubric, “literary fiction”: “It was clever marketing by publishers to set certain contemporary fiction apart and declare it Literature—and therefore Important, Art, and somehow better than other writing … Jane Austen’s works are described as literary fiction. This is nonsense … Austen never for a moment imagined she was writing Literature. Posterity decided that—not her, not John Murray, not even her contemporary readership. She wrote fiction, to entertain and to make money.”

    For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

     
  9. It’s sort of like showing up to Thanksgiving having said you’d bring green bean casserole, except you brought a single green bean on a paper plate. Even though this will obviously not feed any of the other guests and barely counts as a green bean casserole, you sneer at those who are protesting, telling them that they never specified what a green bean casserole is and besides that, they’re being whiny babies.

    You wave the single limp green bean in the air and tell them that it’s obvious they’ll never be happy, that they’re complaining for the sake of complaining and that it’s no wonder they don’t get to eat quality green bean casserole because nobody wants to share green bean casserole with such an aggressive and unfriendly group.

    In other words, making a character bisexual only to immediately write them out of the show makes me feel like shoving a green bean up someone’s nose.

     
  10. image: Download

    smartgirlsattheparty:

humansofnewyork:

"What’s your favorite thing about her?""Her intelligence.""What’s a time that she really impressed you with her intelligence?""Every single day. She’s the CFO of my company."

Yes.

    smartgirlsattheparty:

    humansofnewyork:

    "What’s your favorite thing about her?"
    "Her intelligence."
    "What’s a time that she really impressed you with her intelligence?"
    "Every single day. She’s the CFO of my company."

    Yes.

     
  11. bisexual-books:

    queerbookclub:

    A tale of two trans teen books… OK, these books don’t have too much in common, but I read them back to back and can’t help comparing. They’re both by authors who are not transgender, and I approached them both with trepidation. One did a better job winning me over than the other. Here are my thoughts:


    Freakboy by Kristen Elizabeth Clark is a novel in verse told from the point of view of three characters: Brendan, who is struggling with depression and dysphoria; Vanessa, Brendan’s tough but sensitive girlfriend; and Angel, an adult trans woman who extends a lifeline to Brendan. The title of this one kept me away for a while (and honestly, I still kind of hate it - what young person questioning their gender wants to pick up a book with this insult on the cover?), but I decided to give it a chance because of the author’s preface. Clark emphasizes that she is writing a transgender narrative, not the transgender narrative. This book does have its problems - Angel (a character of color) employs slang that sometimes feels like Clark (who is white) trying too hard, and like I said, that title continues to rub me wrong.

    Generally, though? I am glad this is a YA narrative that’s out there. Its multiple first-person point of views offer an access point for trans, cis and not-sure-I’m-either readers. It’s a refreshing change from books like Almost Perfect and Luna that only view trans girls through cisgender characters’ eyes. The expressive verse style might be a hook for readers who wouldn’t otherwise read a story like this. And overall, I think Clark does a good job achieving her stated goal - creating a narrative that is self-evidently just one perspective in a vast world of trans experiences.


    Beyond Mangenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out by Susan Kuklin is a collection of first-person-style essays gleaned from interviews with transgender people in their late teens and early twenties. I’m not going to beat around the bush: this book made me really uncomfortable. I couldn’t shake the vibe of exploitation - this is an adult cis author putting the childhoods and coming out stories of young trans people on display. Yes, I gave Freakboy's cis author a bit more leeway, but this is a non-fiction book that involves young, often vulnerable participants. Is a cis woman who admittedly didn’t know much about trans people when she decided to make a book about them the right person to handle this project? She edited these stories down into narratives - how did she decide what made the cut? For example, why did a bunch of casual sexism and fatphobia make it in? I don’t necessarily blame the young folks profiled in the book for that stuff - that’s sort of the point, that they’re just “typical teens”. But how are these young people going to feel about this book in ten years, or heck, in two?

    Among my least favorite elements are talkshow-trope “before” photos included in two of the profiles. The author also interjects an “XX chromosomes mean your body does this, XY means your body does that” into one chapter - first, my body disagrees, second, this doesn’t come up again or get complicated further despite the inclusion of an intersex teen in a later chapter. While I’m glad the book has a “Further Resources” section, it’s a mixed bag - the non-fiction list is pretty good, but the only fiction mentioned is Middlesex and Luna, two books I would probably not hand to a trans teen. The movies list is also not inspiring - early 90s films like The Crying Game, M. Butterfly and Priscilla, Queen of the Desert probably should have been passed over for more recent, relevant movies like Gun Hill Road  and My Prairie Home.

    This book might be OK as a Trans 101 - I was glad that it included trans women, trans men, and non-binary trans people, and that half of the interviewees are people of color. But there’s not much new here. If you’re looking for non-fiction trans books for teens, I would instead recommend one of the many out there that were conceived and authored by trans people: Revolutionary Voices, The Gender Book, Kicked Out, Hello Cruel World or Gender Outlaws.

    I have nothing but respect for you queerbookclub, but there’s something about your review of Beyond Magenta that just doesn’t sit right with me as a person who works with teens in my professional life.   Where you see exploitation in this book, I see so much strength.  And I see a lot of ageism in your review. 

    Now would this project have been done better if Kuklin was trans?  Absolutely, but I think that you’re really selling these teens short if you assume that 16-19 year-olds are inherently incapable of consenting to a project like this just because of their age.

    What I liked best about Beyond Magenta was that it wasn’t made FOR teens, it was made in collaboration WITH them.  That is so rare for teen media.   If you read the notes in the back, the author approved everything with these teens before publication, so she did not “decide what made the cut” as you put it.  She’s said in interviews that “While actually writing I tried to choose statements that told their story but were not voyeuristic. To be sure that everything was accurate, the teens were invited to read their chapters throughout the editing process.”  She did not approach these teens.  Teens were informed that someone was doing this project, and it was up to them if they wanted to reach out to her. Several of them are teens in the technical sense not the cultural sense since they are over 18; as adults it is entirely their choice to participate or not.   

    But I’m also uncomfortable with your criticism of these teens for making the choice to share photographs of themselves pre-transition.  It sounds like you’re saying they shouldn’t do that, or that Kuklin must have roped them into it.  But if these teens are comfortable with it, then that is their choice and one that I think deserves support, not criticism.  It’s a trope when talkshows, media, and cis people demand those kinds of photos not when trans people freely share them.    It seems to skirt into respectability politics to say that those trans teens shouldn’t have shared those photos.  It implies there is a right or real or proper way to tell a trans story and these teens are somehow failing at doing it right because they are too young and foolish to know better.

    I also feel like raising the specter of “how are these young people going to feel about this book in ten years, or heck, in two?” is ageist and insulting to teens.  Teens do embarrassing stuff ALL THE TIME.   If they are anything like the teens I work with every day, they are hyperaware of how something can be embarrassing.  Maybe they will look back on this book and cringe.  Maybe they will not.  Maybe years later an adult will look back on a book they were in and cringe.  They deserve respect and praise for taking that risk in order to give much-needed representation to trans teens like themselves.   I think it’s condescending to assume that they don’t understand the concept of consequences because they are young.

    No one is telling these stories and if they are, it’s in novels like Freakboy not in non-fiction work.  Mainstream media does not take the stories of trans teens seriously.   I have seen my trans teens at work pour over this book like it is the second coming because they’ve never seen people that look so much like themselves before.   It is not a perfect book and I agree that there are problematic elements — the fatphobia made me wince, it was intermittently cissexist, and the Resources section was shitty.   But I think you’re selling these teens way to short because of their age. 

    - Sarah

     
  12. image: Download

    intothebeautifulnew:

Poet Edna St. Vincent Millay at Vassar College, 1914.  Photo by Arnold Genthe.

    intothebeautifulnew:

    Poet Edna St. Vincent Millay at Vassar College, 1914.  Photo by Arnold Genthe.

     
  13. 20:37

    Notes: 31962

    Reblogged from gabzillaattack

    Tags: feminismsexismdatingrelationships

    I think we still live in a culture that assumes that men are single by choice and women are single because no one wants them.
     
  14. 20:36

    Notes: 296

    Reblogged from macchi-bou

    Tags: william shakespeareshakespeare

    nprbooks:

It’s William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! (Well, OK, no one knows the exact day he was born, but devotees have adopted April 23 as the day to celebrate, so we will too.)
To mark the occasion, here are three random things you may not have known about the Bard:
What Do Jay Z And Shakespeare Have In Common? Swagger: As with so many other famous words and phrases, Shakespeare was the first to use “swagger.”
Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder: Research suggests that he was prosecuted for evading taxes and for hoarding grain during a famine and then reselling it at inflated prices. 
Shakespeare’s Accent: How Did The Bard Really Sound?: A little more Edinburgh — and sometimes even more Appalachia — than you might expect. 
HBD, Will!
-Nicole
gif via giphy

    nprbooks:

    It’s William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! (Well, OK, no one knows the exact day he was born, but devotees have adopted April 23 as the day to celebrate, so we will too.)

    To mark the occasion, here are three random things you may not have known about the Bard:

    HBD, Will!

    -Nicole

    gif via giphy

     
  15. (Source: sandandglass)